THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO UNDERSTANDING GMAT SCORES AND PERCENTILE

We all are aware that getting into business school is getting competitive and so is excelling on the GMAT.

Here in this article we will guide you to understand GMAT percentiles, along with some guidelines for what percentiles you need to get into various business schools.

So without any further ado, let’s get started with the basics.

WHAT ARE GMAT PERCENTILES?

Whenever you get the GMAT score report, you will find the percentile ranking for each and every section score and your total scores. But what do these percentile account for?

These are basically indication to the proportion of the test takers that you performed better than. If you have scored 75 percentile, this indicates that you have scored higher than 75% of other people.

Obtaining a score in the high percentile shows that you have done better than majority of other people. If you scored a low percentile, this means that you have scored lower than most other test takers.

As a matter of fact, if you took the GMAT in 2012, then your percentile will be different today than they were at the first place. This is due to the fact that percentiles get updated each year; they could fluctuate slightly over time.

Mostly, they have shifted down with the increase in the average GMAT score.

GMAT SCORES TO PERCENTILES FROM 2013-2015

In the chart given below, you will find certain numbers released by the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC). These are dependent on marks of around 7, 50,000 students who took the GMAT between 2013 and 2015.

The first chart represents how total scores correspond to percentiles from 0-99%. The next one indicates how scores to percentiles in the Quantitative, Verbal, Integrated Reasoning, and AWA sections, in that order.

TOTAL SCORES

The chart given below represents how the total score matches up with the GMAT score percentiles. The total GMAT score ranges from around 200 to 800. As per the GMAC, the average score of all the test takers of GMAT is 551.94.

In order to score in the 99th percentile, you need to score around 760 or higher.

QUANTATIVE SECTION

The average score in the Quantative section varies from 0 to 60. As the students rarely score more than 51 or less than 6, GMAC only gives the score’s data in this range.

38.91 is the average Quantative score in the GMAT. In the chart provided below, you will observe that you need top math scores to get a score above the 80th percentile.

VERBAL SECTION

Just like the Quantative scores, the score in the verbal section varies from 0 to 60 and majority of the students get a score between 6 and 51.

The average GMAT score of the verbal section is 26.8, which is obviously lower than the average Quantative score. As less people score high under this section, the GMAT percentiles are less competitive. You need to score around 45 and above in order to fall in the 99th percentile in verbal section.

INTEGRATED REASONING SECTION

This section was introduced in the year 2012 and is scored between 1 and 8. Here the average score is around 4.23. If you obtain a perfect score, it corresponds to the 92th percentile, because around 8 per cent of the test takers obtain full score.

ANALYTICAL WRITING ASSESSMENT (AWA) SECTION

The essay written by you will be graded between 0 and 6. You can access this score when you get your official GMAT score report, about 20 days after you take the test.

The average score under this section is around 4.37. A perfect score will correspond to 90th percentile as the rest 10 per cent of the test takers obtain a 6.

HOW HAVE GMAT PERCENTILES CHANGED OVER TIME?

If you analyse the reports from the past 15 years, you will find that percentiles for Quantitative scores and total scores have gotten more competitive over time as average GMAT scores have gone up.

For instance, in the year 2000, a total GMAT score of 630 fell into the 80th percentile. Is the scenario still the same today? Currently it corresponds to the 69th percentile.

As more people are scoring high on the GMAT, specifically in the math section, it is getting harder to score in a high percentile.

The business schools have understood that these percentiles change over time. Though they do not have a fixed cut off, they do consider your GMAT percentiles when evaluating your application.

Are GMAT PERCENTILES IMPORTANT IN BUSINESS SCHOOL ADMISSIONS?

The business schools take into consideration both the score as well as the percentile while evaluating your application. Though they don’t typically publicize a cut-off score, they look at your GMAT score report as a priority in their evaluation. The admission panel makes sure that you have a certain score before considering the rest of your application.

The percentiles offer a sense of how your score compares to the population of other GMAT test-takers. Specifically, some selective schools desire competitive candidates, and high percentiles tell them that you tested better than the majority of other applicants.

Majority of the students who get top business score have a total score in around the 90th percentile or higher.

WHAT DO GMAT PERCENTILE YOU NEED FOR BUSINESS SCHOOLS?

As mentioned earlier, the business schools do not have a specific cut off for scores or percentiles. They focus on your grades and test scores, and also consider your previous education, work experience, essays, and recommendation letters.

These scores are really important to reveal whether you have the reasoning skills to excel in a business school classroom.

These are often the seen as a jump-off point and the panel may not pay much attention to the rest of your application if your scores are too low. The average score of the GMAT of the test takers is somewhere around 552.

Some schools tend to accept students with a GMAT score of 700 or above, which corresponds to the 89th percentile.

2018-09-04T20:29:38+00:00